Welcome to Your Child’s Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College

Welcome to Your Child’s Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College

How children think is one of the most enduring mysteries-and difficulties-encountered by parents. In an effort to raise our children smarter, happier, stronger, and better, parents will try almost anything, from vitamins to toys to DVDs. But how can we tell marketing from real science? And what really goes through your kid’s growing mind-as an infant, in school, and during adolescence?

Neuroscientists Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang (who is also a parent) explain the facets and functions of the developing brain, discussing salient subjects such as sleep problems, language learning, gender differences, and autism. They dispel common myths about important subjects such as the value of educational videos for babies, the meaning of ADHD in the classroom, and the best predictor of academic success (hint: It’s not IQ ). Most of all, this book helps you know when to worry, how to respond, and, most important, when to relax.

Welcome to Your Child’s Brain upends myths and misinformation with practical advice, surprising revelations, and real, reliable science. It’s essential reading for parents of children of any age, from infancy well into their teens.

List Price: $ 26.00

Price: $ 13.48


3 Comments so far »

  1. Just a consumer "justconsume" said,

    Wrote on November 17, 2011 @ 12:53 pm

    48 of 50 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    What got me interested in this book, September 14, 2011
    This review is from: Welcome to Your Child’s Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College (Hardcover)

    This book is for parents or anyone interested in the dramatic changes in our brain and behavior that we humans undergo during our first quarter century of life. Let me tell you what got me interested in this book.

    It is written by two neuroscientists, one (Aamodt) who is the former editor-in-chief for Nature Neuroscience, a highly respected scientific journal, and another (Wang) who is a professor and researcher at Princeton University, and is also a father.

    In spite of the impressive scientific credentials of its authors, it is written in an approachable style. As Moira Gunn points out in her interview with Aamodt, the book’s 30 chapters, most around 10 pages long, are interspersed with subsections with nearly two dozen practical tips, several myth-busting insights, and the occasional speculation. Each of the 30 topics is about a certain period in a child’s life, with the periods overlapping with each other. So while chapter 4, “Beyond Nature Versus Nurture” covers from conception to the college years, chapter 11 on “Connecting with Your Baby Through Hearing and Touch” is limited to the period from the third trimester to age 2, chapter 13 on “The Best Gift You Can Give: Self-control” is about children from 2 to 7 years old, and chapter 25 (“The Many Roads to Reading”) covers from 4 to 12 years.

    I gave the book four stars initially (September 14), but now that I’ve gone through the whole book, I’m giving it the fifth star. I think it is the second book that any parent with newborns or pre-teens should get…I say second because “Welcome to Your Child’s Brain” is not trying to be comprehensive, but the topics it does cover, it covers it in a no-nonsense way, deeply rooted in science as of 2010-11.

    In today’s digital world, it can be hard to judge the reliability of advice we find online; this book manages to document the basis for (I think) everything substantive it addresses, doing so in a way that is unobtrusive and does not distract you when you are reading it. Because of their credentials, you may not have the time or inclination to check their references, but I find it comforting to know that if I am skeptical about something Aamodt or Wang say, they gave me enough information that I can go online and check on the subject in detail.

    I wish there was a book organized like this on other subjects: “Welcome to Your Retirement Plan” perhaps…?

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  2. A. J. Ratner said,

    Wrote on November 17, 2011 @ 1:36 pm

    13 of 13 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Fantastic! A wonderful, intelligent, thought-provoking read., September 18, 2011
    By 
    A. J. Ratner (New York, NY United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Welcome to Your Child’s Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College (Hardcover)

    This is an absolutely great book for parents (new, experienced, or expecting), teachers, or anyone else interested in how children’s brains develop. Aamodt and Wang are first-class neuroscientists and are not afraid to delve into the latest research to help bring their point across. Nonetheless, this book is accessible to all readers, regardless of scientific background. Unlike authors of similar books, they have chosen to present topics that are actually of interest to parents and offer useful advice in addition to scientific understanding. This title is now at the absolute top of my list of books to get for new parents!

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  3. A. Seelke said,

    Wrote on November 17, 2011 @ 2:13 pm

    12 of 12 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Engaging and helpful, September 19, 2011
    By 
    A. Seelke
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Welcome to Your Child’s Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College (Hardcover)

    As both a developmental neuroscientist and a new parent, I am keenly aware of how much the brain changes throughout the lifespan. Of course, knowing facts about brain development and being able to effectively use that information to enrich your child’s development are two different things. This book does an excellent job of reviewing the scientific literature and giving advice on how to practically apply that information in your everyday life. After reading this book, I feel like I have a better understanding of how my child interacts with and learns about the world, and I know what I can do to help encourage his development.

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