Sex and Common-Sense Reviews

Sex and Common-Sense

Sex and Common-Sense

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

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3 Comments so far »

  1. MacJam said,

    Wrote on October 31, 2013 @ 6:00 pm

    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Good read, April 9, 2013
    By 
    MacJam

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    I liked the product and would share with everyone. Item was delivered within a timely manner and I enjoyed immensely.

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  2. Jason S. Taylor "Marco's Realto" said,

    Wrote on October 31, 2013 @ 6:10 pm

    6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Perspective From Historical Interest, November 4, 2011
    By 
    Jason S. Taylor “Marco’s Realto” (Portland Oregon) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

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    This is a fair enough tract small tract of 76 pages(dead tree) but it is mostly of historical interest. It is a social essay not a sex manual but it is not self-righteous or overbearing in tone and the author comes out as pleasant in tone if somewhat overidealistic. It often deals with problems that have simply changed their emphasis as time went by. While sex and problems related to it will always be with us, the way we react changes, and I suspect no generation gets it right; she would certainly be as opposed to modern looseness as she was to post-victorian uptightness. The writer was in her time a noted feminist, which is to say a 1920’s feminist, not a 2010 feminist. She however was not an ideologue like those who get wrapped up in political causes so often are and in fact is noted for her mercy and forbearance for everyone’s point of view. She doesn’t have the painful air of shrillness that make all moral questions into a tribal vendetta in the way all factions concerned sometimes treat them today.

    What is interesting, is that though some of her concerns are dated in the since of being directed at the troubles of her time rather then ours a surprising number are remarkably similar. And the same arguments that were used then were often rehashed. More gently to be sure, but one can recognize them. Her urging of mercy on those who don’t succeed in moral rectitude is noted. In some ways she is to idealistic; her demands for love in marriage are well taken but she fails to take account of how so often in history spouses normally never met each other before the ceremony(though she does touch lightly on the “mail order” solution to population disproportion). To say that marriage “with no love” is “not a real marriage” as she almost seems to do, seems to me to be an overhigh standard, and a rather unintentionally cruel one. The author does give a plea for the state of single women which I can identify with being an involuntary celebate male myself. I would disagree with her opinion on no-fault divorce both because I think you simply have to live with the promises you make, and because I come of a generation that has had to live with the consequences of the policy.

    I can’t agree with all her solutions. Partly this is of course, because I am not quite sure what she is proposing. But insofar as I can understand her I can see problems from hindsight. Be that as it may, I think the greatest benefit from reading this comes from perspective. It is less easy to get upset when one realizes that our ancestors dealt with many of the same difficulties, had the same arguments, and frankly they messed it all up too. They just messed it up in different ways-but not so different that one cannot recognize things. The past may be a foreign country but in some ways it is not that foreign. One can see from this that our descendants will mess things up as well and their descendants will too. It is a decent relaxant to know this and it drains worry and factional anger away. For this reason, this tract is worth reading.

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  3. Anonymous said,

    Wrote on October 31, 2013 @ 7:06 pm

    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Just blah…, August 21, 2013
    By 
    S. Jordan “Shay” (Milwaukee, WI) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

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    This review is from: Sex and Common-Sense (Kindle Edition)

    It wasn’t a great book. I thought it would be more intriguing and informative than it was but it really wasn’t.

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