Self-Therapy: A Step-By-Step Guide to Creating Wholeness and Healing Your Inner Child Using IFS, A New, Cutting-Edge Psychotherapy, 2nd Edition Reviews

Self-Therapy: A Step-By-Step Guide to Creating Wholeness and Healing Your Inner Child Using IFS, A New, Cutting-Edge Psychotherapy, 2nd Edition

Self-Therapy: A Step-By-Step Guide to Creating Wholeness and Healing Your Inner Child Using IFS, A New, Cutting-Edge Psychotherapy, 2nd Edition

Understand your psyche in a clear and comprehensive way, and resolve deep-seated emotional issues. Self-Therapy makes the power of a cutting-edge psychotherapy approach accessible to everyone. Internal Family Systems Therapy (IFS) has been spreading rapidly across the country in the past decade. It is incredibly effective on a wide variety of life issues, such as self-esteem, procrastination, depression, and relationship issues. IFS is also user-friendly; it helps you to comprehend the complexity of your psyche. Dr. Earley shows how IFS is a complete method for psychological healing that you can use on your own.

Self-Therapy is also helpful for therapists because it presents the IFS model in such detail that it is a manual for the method.

List Price: $ 19.95

Price: $ 12.97


3 Comments so far »

  1. Russ Pool said,

    Wrote on February 27, 2013 @ 2:03 am

    50 of 51 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    To learn IFS therapy, GET THIS BOOK., October 27, 2009
    By 
    Russ Pool
    (REAL NAME)
      

    If you’re wanting to learn IFS, GET THIS BOOK. I couldn’t repeat that too much.

    I took the official IFS Level I trainings, 6 long weekends and many thousand dollars. On the very last weekend I dove into “Self Therapy.” It was only then that I got the practical how to of IFS. Jay Earley’s writing made it click.

    The author made what seemed so vague and impractical during the training come alive. His straight forward writing and descriptive images communicate the practical side. His introduction makes sense to my clients. His condensed version of an IFS session at the back of the book is worth the price several times over. Need I say more? If you want to learn IFS, GET THIS BOOK.

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  2. Kathy F. Grace said,

    Wrote on February 27, 2013 @ 2:06 am

    33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Self-Therapy… Jay Earley, October 21, 2009
    By 
    Kathy F. Grace (Chapel Hill, NC) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This text is invaluable for clinicians as well as for individuals who want to do internal psychological healing work on their own. Dr. Earley explains each concept in several different ways to ensure clarity and the illustrations are a great visual look at how our ‘Parts’ interact with each other. He had supplied comprehensive, exciting and ‘do-able homework’ that walks us through each concept. This methodology brings compassion and deep respect for client’s and their ‘Parts’, while offering an experiential way for us to get to know our Selves.

    I am on my second read and still catching nuances that I missed the first time. This will be a book that I will re-read many times and will consult frequently.

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  3. Prokopton said,

    Wrote on February 27, 2013 @ 2:48 am

    57 of 61 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    The coming thing, and it’s very good, March 13, 2011
    By 
    Prokopton (London, UK) –

    EDIT: One year on, this is still a good book but I now see the market is crowded with parts/ego states therapies and they are all good. I personally am coming to prefer some of the original stuff from the stream of the Watkinses, especially the work of Emmerson which I find technically superior to IFS and more comfortable for me — in particular, I now don’t agree with the parts typology of IFS which I think creates parts unnecessarily. (Yes I do think parts are created or anyway re-created by means of therapy; to observe something alters it.) There is also too much focus on the reality of imagined images in IFS and not enough on their malleability and ultimate unreality or virtuality.

    I am docking a star but will let the original review stand below for reference — I do try to do “longitudinal reviewing” for books of this type, updating after a period of time, because experience is the only real arbiter. (Many reviews here will be from people who haven’t tried the techniques at length). One should also explore the parts therapy of Hunter if interested in hypnosis, which I am, and there is a new book by Noricks from last year that I haven’t got to yet. Finally I think Schmidt’s The Developmental Needs Meeting Strategy is also excellent.

    So I recommend shopping around when it comes to ego states therapies. TA and Psychosynthesis still also have much to recommend them. In any therapy based off ego states where trauma resolution is the aim, I believe the typologies need to create freedom and improvisational possibilities for the synthesis of new patterns and in the end IFS didn’t allow me to be so creative as I’d like. Personally I develop Self on a different model now too and my transpersonal experience suggests one should be very careful how one defines systemic connections with others — still, we are all different which is why options are good. I don’t dismiss this book but would now be less glowing. Best wishes and good luck! (April 29 2012)

    —————————————————-

    IFS seems to be expanding now, lots of practitioners and trainings and a certain “hey this works” buzz gathering around it. I can’t remember how I heard about it, but I’m very glad I did. I’ve always been interested in therapies which employ the concept of “parts”/”subpersonalities”/”ego states”, but have never felt I got beyond a certain point with the concept. IFS has, so far, proven to be the missing key I needed. It takes parts therapy past anything else I’ve tried for dynamic psychological self discovery and healing.

    Jay Earley’s book is for the beginner who wants to practice IFS, including completely alone, which is highly feasible. As such it goes slowly, explains carefully, and contains a lot of encouragement for the initially unsure. It is however far from lacking in experienced wisdom, and I will testify you can do wonderful stuff with it and nothing else.

    So what is IFS? Essentially it’s a method of healing the psyche that treats ‘parts’ of the personality as existing in an inner system, with each part playing a certain role. In particular, parts can be seen as broadly divided into two types (at least in Earley’s rendition): Protectors, which are open to meet the outside world, but playing a defensive and not fully authentic role; and Exiles, whom the Protectors hide from the world, which are authentic but in pain and dissociated. The basic IFS method, as Earley lays it out, is to get to know Protectors, ask their permission to meet the Exiles they protect, and then heal those Exiles of the burden of trauma or difficult experience they carry.

    Another way to talk about how IFS works… Earley says on p. 234: “IFS uses the term _exile_ to refer to what has often been called the _inner child_. However, people often talk about _the_ inner child as if there were only one. In IFS we recognize that there are many inner child parts or exiles, each carrying its own burden. Every exile must be healed in a way that is unique to it…” In practice, it suddenly seems incredible that this idea, which is absolutely correct, has never been seen before. If psychodynamicists had been speaking of ‘many superego-style parts’ and ‘many id-style parts’, who knows what rigidities of interpretation would have been avoided these many decades? One could certainly see many other psychotherapeutic models as single instances of the far more flexible internal family systems approach. (Terence Watts’ interesting Warriors, Settlers &

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