Rediscovering Psychoanalysis: Thinking and Dreaming, Learning and Forgetting (The New Library of Psychoanalysis)

Rediscovering Psychoanalysis: Thinking and Dreaming, Learning and Forgetting (The New Library of Psychoanalysis)

Rediscovering Psychoanalysis: Thinking and Dreaming, Learning and Forgetting (The New Library of Psychoanalysis)

Winner of the 2010 Haskell Norman Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Psychoanalysis!

Rediscovering Psychoanalysis demonstrates how, by attending to one’s own idiosyncratic ways of thinking, feeling, and responding to patients, the psychoanalyst can develop a “style” of his or her own, a way of practicing that is a living process originating, to a large degree, from the personality and experience of the analyst.

This book approaches rediscovering psychoanalysis from four vantage points derived from the author’s experience as a clinician, a supervisor, a teacher, and a reader of psychoanalysis. Thomas Ogden begins by presenting his experience of creating psychoanalysis freshly in the form of “talking-as-dreaming” in the analytic session; this is followed by an exploration of supervising and teaching psychoanalysis in a way that is distinctly one’s own and unique to each supervisee and seminar group. Ogden goes on to rediscover psychoanalysis in this book as he continues  his series of close readings of seminal analytic works. Here, he makes original theoretical contributions through the exploration, explication, and extension of the work of Bion, Loewald, and Searles.

Throughout this text, Thomas Ogden offers ways of revitalizing and reinventing the exchange between analyst and patient in each session, making this book essential reading for psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, and other readers with an interest in psychoanalysis.

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3 Comments so far »

  1. M. Morrissey said,

    Wrote on June 28, 2012 @ 1:05 pm

    20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Quite a Memorable Feast, January 3, 2009
    By 
    M. Morrissey (San Francisco, CA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Rediscovering Psychoanalysis: Thinking and Dreaming, Learning and Forgetting (The New Library of Psychoanalysis) (Hardcover)

    When I read a book by Thomas Ogden, my understanding of myself and what I attempt to do as a psychotherapist is forever altered. When reading his work, I either find that I can’t put it down, or that I purposely leave off on certain sections because the thoughts are so painfully beautiful that I can no longer take them in. This book is no different.

    He is the kind of analyst and writer that makes you shake your head in disbelief. Did he say what I think he just said? Yes, he did. These are the kinds of insights into the workings of the mind that give you chills, that make you shout out loud, that plant generative roots into your unconscious. Clearly there will be a paper written one day on reading Ogden, just as in this volume we are treated to Ogden’s own exquisite readings of Searles, Bion, and Loewald.

    When Ogden writes about a clinical session, it is like watching a master chef prepare a meal. A master chef will cook many things at once, but each dish will come out at the proper time, cooked perfectly. This is largely because the chef has cooked each component thousands of times, and has an innate feel for when each component has reached its peak of flavor. It is the same with Ogden. He himself states, “It requires a very long time– in my experience, something on the order of a decade or two of full-time clinical practice– to mature as an analyst to a point where one is able, with some consistency, to talk with each of one’s patients in a way that is uniquely one’s own, and unique to that moment in the analytic conversation with that particular patient.” Indeed. Ogden cooks up such a feast: tracking and formulating transference manifestations of the patient’s communications at one moment, making silent interpretations to himself at the next (because he knows that to make the interpretation out loud would be to ruin the unfolding enlivening experience), dipping into reverie and then back out, and finally saying something that is attuned to the heart of the patient’s emotional experience, only moments later to discover that he said more than he even knew. This is full-flavor psychoanalytic cuisine.

    But I think Ogden does even more in this book by continually demonstrating his humility in the face of all the complexity. Sure, he’s a master clinician, but there is something in the way he writes that does not give the impression of being a show-off. You want to think and do clinical work like him not out of envy, but because he has carefully invited you into a realm of mental space that you now remember is the reason why you became a therapist or analyst in the first place.

    Eat this book, chew it, swirl it around. These are depths and layers that stain the senses.

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  2. Gary Bruschi said,

    Wrote on June 28, 2012 @ 1:40 pm

    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Esoteric Reading, February 25, 2011
    By 
    Gary Bruschi
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I’m biased on this one. I’m a psychoanalyst and the book was assigned reading for a study group I’m in. I already knew what it was about and I loved it all the same.

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  3. Marc A. Stettler said,

    Wrote on June 28, 2012 @ 1:46 pm

    6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Less than I expected, May 29, 2009
    By 
    Marc A. Stettler (Rio de Janeiro / Brazil) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Rediscovering Psychoanalysis: Thinking and Dreaming, Learning and Forgetting (The New Library of Psychoanalysis) (Hardcover)

    Maybe because I enjoyed other books of Ogden (as Subjects of Analysis) and also because of the “panoramic” assumptions of the title I had quite high expectations and was a bit disappointed.
    The title of the book refers to: start without desire nor memory, with a beginner’s mind.(It’s not the proposition of a new paradigm).
    I had to speedread through the first have of the book. Fortunalely the last three chapters of the book are interesting.

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