Psychology in the Spirit: Contours of a Transformational Psychology (Christian Worldview Integration) Reviews

Psychology in the Spirit: Contours of a Transformational Psychology (Christian Worldview Integration)

Psychology in the Spirit: Contours of a Transformational Psychology (Christian Worldview Integration)

  • Can real change happen in the human soul?
  • Is it possible to have truly healthy relationships?
  • Is psychology something that can help us see reality as God sees it?

John H. Coe and Todd W. Hall tackle these and other provocative questions in this next volume of the Christian Worldview Integration Series which offers an introduction to a new approach to psychology that seeks to integrate psychology and spiritual formation. This model “represents a spiritual formation and relational approach to psychology for the sake of servicing the spiritual needs of the church.” Their goal is to provide a unique model of doing psychology and science in the Spirit. Here you will find an introduction to the foundations, methodology, content and praxis for this new approach to soulcare.

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2 Comments so far »

  1. Jacob Sweeney said,

    Wrote on February 3, 2012 @ 9:56 am

    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Truly Integrated Approach, December 18, 2011
    By 
    Jacob Sweeney (Louisville, KY) –

    This review is from: Psychology in the Spirit: Contours of a Transformational Psychology (Christian Worldview Integration) (Paperback)

    The Christian and science communities have had a tumultuous relationship. That tumult has continued into the discussion of faith and psychology. There are a number of positions along a spectrum from unconditional rejection to unconditional acceptance. Nouthetic (Bible-only) counselors advocate for unconditional rejection of anything psychology may produce. Opposite the nouthetic counselors are those who may be Christians but make little to no integration. In between are various sorts of integrated folks who work to marry faith and psychology.

    Into this fray of opinions and discussion John Coe and Todd Hall and written Psychology in the Spirit. They are frank in their admission:

    The goal of this book is truly impossible in this life: to redeem and transform psychology by the Spirit. Ultimately, we are not merely arguing for a new model or way to relate psychology to Christianity; rather, we are arguing for a new transformational model for doing psychology and science, which inherently and intrinsically is already Christian and open to science (35).
    Coe and Hall envision doing the work of psychology from a distinctly Christian position. They understand that sin keeps us from seeing ourselves correctly. As Christians we have to rely on the Holy Spirit in order to see ourselves in truth.

    This is the strength of this book. Coe and Hall are adamant about the need Christians have for the empowering ministry of the Holy Spirit – even counselors and psychologists. In my estimation, despite their attempt at creating an entirely new model of psychological study, they are actually being integrated. Integrated counselors often do not go back enough before integrating. But, they also don’t fall pray to the simplistic position of nouthetic counselors. We are sinful human beings and sin does impede our ability to understand our souls and the souls of others. However, as Christians we do have the Spirit whose ministry includes illumination. It is only by the Spirit are we able to see clearly and minister effectively.

    This is an excellent text. I believe that Coe and Hall have done a wonderful job in presenting their position. Additionally, they paint a picture of psychology and counseling that fits wonderfully into a distinctly Christian worldview. This is a truly integrated approach. This book would make great reading for any Christian counselor, student of counselor or pastor.

    NOTE: In accordance with the regulations of the Federal Trade Commission I would like to state that I received a complementary copy of the aforementioned text for the purposes of review. I was not required to furnish a positive review.

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  2. wjg828 said,

    Wrote on February 3, 2012 @ 10:29 am

    4 of 17 people found the following review helpful:
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Too much, December 14, 2010
    By 
    wjg828

    This review is from: Psychology in the Spirit: Contours of a Transformational Psychology (Christian Worldview Integration) (Paperback)

    This book was too much. It was very wordy and took alot of pages to say what it could have said in 20. I had to read this book for a counseling class, and halfway through the class my prof told me we didn’t have to finish it because it was too complicated. Might be ok for someone who is very advanced in their counseling or psychology, but definitely not for beginners or even moderately experienced people.

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