On the History of the Psycho-Analytic Movement (The Standard Edition) (Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud)

On the History of the Psycho-Analytic Movement (The Standard Edition) (Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud)

Of the various English translations of Freud’s major works to appear in his lifetime, only one was authorized by Freud himself: The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud under the general editorship of James Strachey.

Freud approved the overall editorial plan, specific renderings of key words and phrases, and the addition of valuable notes, from bibliographical and explanatory. Many of the translations were done by Strachey himself; the rest were prepared under his supervision. The result was to place the Standard Edition in a position of unquestioned supremacy over all other existing versions. Newly designed in a uniform format, each new paperback in the Standard Edition opens with a biographical essay on Freud’s life and work —along with a note on the individual volume—by Peter Gay, Sterling Professor of History at Yale.

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1 Comment so far »

  1. "elljay" said,

    Wrote on December 26, 2011 @ 9:12 pm

    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A worthy overview, September 9, 2000
    By 

    This review is from: On the History of the Psycho-Analytic Movement (The Standard Edition) (Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud) (Paperback)

    This engaging little memoir charts the ascent of psychoanalysis as seen through the eyes of its world-famous originator. Beginning with the youthful Freud’s days with pioneer Josef Breuer in late 19th Century Vienna, it charts the burgeoning movement through the psychoanalysis organization that Freud founded in 1908–and which nearly went to pieces a few years later due to some nasty internecine battles. These were obviously trying times for Freud, and the book sometimes lapses into an acrimonious tone (he calls one detractor an “evil genius”); he also shoots a few poisoned arrows at former colleagues Jung and Adler. For the most part, though, it’s a very readable, revealing look back at the days when psychoanalysis was young and had far more enemies than allies: “Occasionally a colleague would make some reference to me in one of his publications; it would be very short and not at all flattering–words such as ‘eccentric’, ‘extreme’, or ‘very peculiar’ would be used.”

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