History or Psychology?? Which is the better degree?

Question by nikkita: History or Psychology?? Which is the better degree?
I like both equally and it’s decision time. Which degree looks best to a business employer? What are the benefits career wise of doing one over the other? Thanks for the help. Advice from actual professionals in the business sector or career advisors would be most helpful :)
I’m worried in case I don’t manage to get the 2:1 needed in Psychology. Should I just go for it anyway seeing as it opens up much more prospects than history?

Best answer:

Answer by Lashayah
Psycology. Plus, you would definitely get a better job.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!


2 Comments so far »

  1. HappyTurtle said,

    Wrote on June 11, 2012 @ 4:01 am

    Psychology would be better there are alot more job opportunities Id say we have enough people that know about history .Alot of people are becoming mentally ill or need some one to talk to .I think it would even help you in many fields such as Human Resources etc,you will do good

  2. Steve Alexander said,

    Wrote on June 11, 2012 @ 4:06 am

    Neither is going to look good to a business employer. However if you study economic history, it might make a difference. History is useful if you are planning to enter LAW, at your University, especially constitutional and legal history. If you love history for it’s own sake, as I did, the best thing to do is combine your courses in history with education courses. A history degree all on its own is not career oriented unless you think about your future practically. An education degree is useful because most Social-Studies teachers are asked at some point, to teach a psychology course or two, along with their social-studies courses. I know plenty of people working in retail with history, drama, art, and psyc degrees, you should always think practically. With a bachelor of education degree, specializing in social studies, you can also go on to do a Master’s degree in history, and with your teaching background stand a better chance of getting tutorials and research grants in your department. I was in the same position at University, I got A’s in all of my history and political-science courses, but didn’t do so well in geology and chemistry. I wanted to be a geophysicist, but didn’t realize how many advanced math courses I would need, and the level of expertise in chemistry, analysis, and the chemical composition of petroleum bearing rock formations. I completed a B.Ed. and then did a Master’s in military history, teaching all the way thru the M.A. as a sub, then as a T.A. in the history department. Looks great on the resume. I then got scholarships based on having good-grades, and was inspired by some of the distinguished historians in my history department. I then applied to study at Cambridge/Oxford and was accepted at one of them, following that I was offered positions at Yale and elsewhere as a historian. Education is your best option, if you want to combine your love of social-science with the real world. If you are not interested in doing advanced degrees, but are still focused on business, talk to someone at your business faculty about doing a business degree. You can take the odd economic history course as an option. I have a brother who took history and psychology and received a B.A.. He then took business courses, specializing in accounting. He worked at a series of banks, and completed classes at night-school until he got his designation as an accountant. It took ten years of work though, and I remember the massive binders of material he had to work thru. I would recommend doing a B.Comm, a Bachelor of Commerce, followed by an M.B.A. if you are serious about a business career. Talk to a counsellor at your University, do not waste time with courses that are not applicable, this is the real world. There are a lot of b.s. courses at Universities, if you are not going to be a lawyer, teacher, or professor, but want to be a businessman, focus on completing the requirements for a BUSINESS DEGREE. Take the history and psychology courses as options along the way, but not as the focus of your studies. Alternatively you can complete a B.A. in history and apply to study LAW. The Law Faculty enrols quite a few history and political science students.

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