Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention (Essentials of Psychological Assessment)

Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention (Essentials of Psychological Assessment)

Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention (Essentials of Psychological Assessment)

Quickly acquire the knowledge and skills you need to effectively understand, assess, and treat individuals struggling with dyslexia

Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention provides practical, step-by-step information on accurately identifying, assessing, and using evidence-based interventions with individuals with dyslexia. Addressing the components that need to be considered in the assessment of dyslexia—both cognitive and academic—this book includes descriptions of the various tests used in a comprehensive dyslexia assessment along with detailed, evidence-based interventions that professionals and parents can use to help individuals struggling with dyslexia.

Like all the volumes in the Essentials of Psychological Assessment series, each concise chapter features numerous callout boxes highlighting key concepts, bulleted points, and extensive illustrative material, as well as test questions that help you gauge and reinforce your grasp of the information covered.

Providing an in-depth look at dyslexia, this straightforward book presents information that will prepare school psychologists, neuropsychologists, educational diagnosticians, special education teachers, as well as general education teachers, to recognize, assess, and provide effective treatment programs for dyslexia. The book is also a good resource for parents who are helping a child with dyslexia.

  • A practical guide to understanding, assessing, and helping individuals who have dyslexia
  • Expert advice and tips throughout
  • Conveniently formatted for rapid reference

Other titles in the Essentials of Psychological Assessment series:
Essentials of Assessment Report Writing
Essentials of School Neuropsychological Assessment
Essentials of Evidence-Based Academic Interventions
Essentials of Response to Intervention
Essentials of Processing Assessment
Essentials of Conners Behavior Assessments
Essentials of Cross-Battery Assessment, Second Edition
Essentials of WISC-IV Assessment, Second Edition

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3 Comments so far »

  1. D. A. J. said,

    Wrote on October 28, 2012 @ 9:35 am

    31 of 39 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Disappointed in what was missing, November 26, 2011
    By 
    D. A. J. (Atlanta, GA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention (Essentials of Psychological Assessment) (Paperback)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    While this book covers many aspects of dyslexia assessment and intervention well, I was absolutely shocked by what was missing from this book. The goal of this book is to be “practical, step-by-step information on accurately identifying, assessing, and using evidence-based interventions with individuals with dyslexia”. For those that understand the complex nature of dyslexia, this is a pretty lofty goal for one book. And, as should be expected with a relatively compact book, it fell well short of meeting its mark. While the book did well in the topics that it covered (for the most part, with some exceptions), the things that were not covered were the most surprising and made me the most uneasy about this book.
    For example, while it is well established that dyslexia disproportionately affects individuals with higher IQ’s, there was very little in this book about gifted children. Over half of all children with dyslexia have above average IQ’s and this book dedicates little more than occasional paragraphs to dealing with gifted children who have dyslexia. In fact, the book barely covers what has become known as “stealth dyslexia” (the book never even mentions stealth dyslexia), which is children that are clearly dyslexic, but are almost impossible to diagnose with traditional methods of assessment because their overall IQ allows them to compensate (mostly temporarily) for their reading difficulties.
    The book also fails to cover the positive attributes associated with individuals with dyslexia. Yes, individuals with dyslexia then to have problems (sometimes very severe) problems with reading, spelling, decoding, phonics, etc. However, they also tend to have excellent abilities in things such as material and dynamic reasoning (basically, they often miss the details, but understand the “gist” of information amazingly well. The often miss the trees, but they understand the forest on a scale often not found in non-dyslexic individuals).
    Another area missing from this book was the possibility of misdiagnosis of other disorders that might mask or mimic dyslexia. I was also pretty shocked that the book never mentioned issues that are sometimes tandem with dyslexia (like vision issues such as eye teaming or eye tracking or auditory processing issues).
    This book really feel into the trap of looking at dyslexia as a “reading disorder” when dyslexia isn’t that at all. Dyslexia if more of a way the brain processes information. Because of the way the the brain of dyslexic individuals tends to process information (looking at the whole instead of individual parts), this makes the acquisition of skills such as reading (both encoding and decoding of phonemes) much more difficult. Reading is a skill of looking at parts and seeing how they make up a whole, if you have trouble seeing the “parts” you are going to have a lot of trouble reading. However, dyslexic individuals don’t tend to have a problem with comprehension – so tagging it as a reading issue only (which was a large gist of this book) is very problematic.
    Another big area of dificiency was the look at home environment – stating that environment was a risk factor for dyslexia – what? Genetics is a risk factor as dyslexic parents tend to have dyslexic children, but dyslexia again is found in the way children process information. This book actually sited things such as lack of books in the home as a possible contributing factor for dyslexia. I have never, ever seen this factor and I have read deeply on dyslexia (I am dyslexic, have a dyslexic child, and have a Master’s degree in Education). Yes, a lack of reading materials and an impoverished language environment IS a risk factor for poor reading skills, but poor reading skills doesn’t equal dyslexia. In fact, this book failed to distinguish between what is a learning disability (like poor phonological awareness, poor decoding skill, poor encoding skill, lack of exposure, poor articulation) and what is dyslexia. I am very concerned for any educator that would use this book as a way of getting information on, diagnosing, and providing intervention for dyslexic individuals. Even the list on interventions and accommodations was woefully inadequate (it listed Earobics as an intervention, but not a just as effective and much more readily available Hear Builder software program). I was also shocked to the core when they actually recommended partnering a dyslexic child with a better reading in the class as a dyslexia intervention. WHAT!!!!! Are you kidding me? One should hope for a trained specialist working with their dyslexic child, if that isn’t available the person helping the child and being a partnered reader should at least be an adult knowledgeable in reading that can provide a safe environment for the child to gain not only skill, but confidence. This book quotes many a “celebrity” that is dyslexic (like Tom Cruise and Steve Forbes) and one of the common themes was feeling “stupid” or being…

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  2. Marshall A. Glenn "Marshall Andrew Glenn, Ph.D." said,

    Wrote on October 28, 2012 @ 10:16 am

    7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention, December 8, 2011
    This review is from: Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention (Essentials of Psychological Assessment) (Paperback)

    Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention is a much needed and welcomed contribution to the field of dyslexia and should appeal to a wide audience including special education teachers, college instructors, psychologists, diagnosticians, parents and even those who suffer from it. Consistent with the Essential series, Mather and Wendling provide comprehensive coverage on the complexities of dyslexia including historical perspectives, neuropsychological research, assessment, technological applications, dyslexia and ELL and evidenced-based programs for remediation. As a practitioner in school psychology with over 30 years of experience and an assistant professor that teaches assessment, I am pleased to recommend this text by two highly respected sagacious authors, both of whom continue to make significant contributions to the field of special education. I am confident you will find it to be a valuable resource. With every good wish, Marshall Andrew Glenn, Ph.D., NCSP, Diplomate, American Board of School Neuropsychology, Assistant Professor, Oklahoma City University.

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  3. M. Feldman said,

    Wrote on October 28, 2012 @ 10:53 am

    6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Buy it for the technology chapter, December 6, 2011
    By 
    M. Feldman (Maine, USA) –
    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
      
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    This review is from: Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention (Essentials of Psychological Assessment) (Paperback)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    “Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment” is, first and foremost, a textbook for teachers and literacy specialists. Its tone is sober and judicious. It avoids presenting information that is controversial or inadequately researched. The first six chapters present the accepted definitions of dyslexia, a short history, a synopsis of current scientific research, and a comprehensive look at how dyslexia affects the reading abilities of children and adults. There are plenty of charts, boxed reference points, and so on, with a summary “Test Yourself” at the end of every chapter. This section is so dense with information that it could be quite daunting unless you were using the text with the guidance of an instructor.

    However, beginning with Chapter 7, the emphasis is on more practical material, and here the book, while still a textbook, also becomes valuable for parents of dyslexic children. In addition to chapters on instruction in phonological awareness, reading and spelling skills, and reading fluency, there is a valuable chapter on technological resources, another on dyslexia in different languages (including a look at ELL students with dyslexia), and a final chapter on special education law. An appendix presents summaries (organized alphabetically) of 26 remediation programs, from Barton to Wilson. There is a good glossary at the end, along with a good index. For parents and teachers alike, it will be a helpful reference. A lot of information has been packed into this book.

    If you’re just learning about dyslexia, is this the book to begin with? No. For that I’d go to Sally Shaywitz’s “Overcoming Dyslexia,” which was written with parents in mind and is excellent on both the scientific and educational aspects of dyslexia. I think that “Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment” is a fine and useful resource, though, and if you have a personal or professional interest in this subject, you’ll want to own it.

    M. Feldman

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