Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope over Suicide (Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands’ Adolescent Mental Health Initiative)

Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope over Suicide (Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands’ Adolescent Mental Health Initiative)

Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope over Suicide (Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands' Adolescent Mental Health Initiative)

As a teenager, DeQuincy Lezine nearly ended his own life, believing it was the only way to escape the emotional pain that was overwhelming him. Instead, Lezine was able to find expert psychiatric care, and went on to found the first university campus-based chapter of the Suicide Prevention Action Network USA.

Now a researcher at the University of Rochester’s Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide, Lezine has devoted his life to preventing suicide in adolescents, and he brings the wealth of his personal and professional experience to bear in Eight Stories Up. He starts by describing his deteriorating state of mind in college, using his own email archive to retell the episode that would nearly claim his life. He then offers hard-earned wisdom and practical advice to other young people who may be considering suicide. In straightforward, easy-to-understand language, and drawing on the psychiatric expertise of David Brent, MD, Lezine discusses the potential causes of suicide in adolescents, how to seek psychiatric treatment, and how to get the most out of professional help. He also surveys some of the therapies used to prevent suicide, how to talk to loved ones about suicidal thoughts, and how to stay healthy at home and at school. The result is both a remarkable memoir and a useful guide that will ease the isolation and hopelessness caused by thoughts of suicide, helping young people to overcome their troubles in a safe and healthy way.

Part of the Adolescent Mental Health Initiative series of books written specifically for teens and young adults, Eight Stories Up offers hope to young people who are at risk of suicide, extending a lifeline of support and guidance that can save their lives.

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3 Comments so far »

  1. Elizabeth J. Mcdermott said,

    Wrote on January 22, 2012 @ 10:00 am

    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Eight Stories Up, May 7, 2008
    By 
    Elizabeth J. Mcdermott (Norwalk, Connecticut) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope over Suicide (Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands’ Adolescent Mental Health Initiative) (Paperback)

    Having lived through my own pain of suicide, Eight Stories Up is insightful and a great reference for any adolescent or their families who may be caught up in the vicious cycle of suicide or suicidal behavior. It was a pleasure to meet Dequincy at a fund raiser for Laurel House in Stamford, Connecticut. After hearing his story, I realized that we both had something in common, I too used to size up buildings on the campus of the school I was attending and the only thing that kept me from jumping was the thought that if I lived through it, I would be paralized and I could not live with that.

    I highly recommend this book to anyone facing the issues mentioned in the book or if they suspect that they have any mental health issues.

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  2. Jay Boll said,

    Wrote on January 22, 2012 @ 10:20 am

    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A book to save young lives…, May 6, 2008
    By 
    Jay Boll
    (REAL NAME)
      

    After meeting DeQuincy Lezine, hearing his story and reading his book, I have no doubt that he will save young lives. His memoir of his own experience with near suicide provides an insider’s look at the feelings, thoughts and circumstances that can lead to a decision to end one’s life, the interventions that can be made to prevent this tragic occurrence, and the healing that takes in the recovery process. The book is written for a teen audience , but is an equally valuable resource for adult family members of teens at risk and professional caregivers. More than just a memoir of one person’s descent into hopelessness and subsequent recovery, it is also a guide for identifying, understanding and grappling with the issues and pressures that can result in teenage suicide. In less than 200 pages, the book covers a lot of ground. It is very clearly written and DeQuincy’s personal story is seamlessly interwoven throughout the text with more practical information about suicide prevention, treatment and recovery. Included in the back are a glossary of terms, bibliography and a resource section with phone numbers and addresses for hotlines, organizations for suicide prevention and mental health advocacy, self-help groups and information services. This book would make an excellent addition to any high school or university library, as well as to the bookshelves of families, friends and helping professionals.

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  3. Anonymous said,

    Wrote on January 22, 2012 @ 10:22 am

    3.0 out of 5 stars
    I wanted to like it…, August 2, 2011
    By 
    D Provencher “D Provencher” (Massachusetts, USA) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope over Suicide (Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands’ Adolescent Mental Health Initiative) (Paperback)

    I really wanted to like this book. I appreciate the concept behind the book and genuinely was excited to read it. However, I found the intertwining of factual story and “self-help” notations quite distracting. After only the first chapter, I admit I gave up. I did however choose to keep it around should my adolescent son choose to read it. I may have unfairly expected too much as I did not find it to be the compelling story of “hope” that I had wished for it to portray. All in all, a very “low level” read likely most appropriate for a teen or mother. Definately not appropriate for someone learning in the psychology field or with any sort of educational baseline of psychology.

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