Conquering Depression and Anxiety Through Exercise

Conquering Depression and Anxiety Through Exercise

Conquering Depression and Anxiety Through Exercise

Johnsgard – who’s served as an expert commentator for the CBS Winter Olympics – also offers keen insights into how to get yourself motivated to do exercise, how to work exercise into your regular routine, and how to best use weight-loss and fat-reducing techniques. He explains in clear language the basics of exercise physiology and its effect on both your mind and your body, ushering in the results of studies that he and others have conducted. If depression and anxiety have overshadowed your life, or you just want to improve your mental outlook while enhancing your physical fitness, this book is a superb motivator to help you help yourself through the healthiest, least expensive, and simplest method available.

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3 Comments so far »

  1. C. Fink said,

    Wrote on June 23, 2012 @ 6:08 pm

    38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Good News from a Runner’s World, July 29, 2004
    By 
    C. Fink
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Conquering Depression and Anxiety Through Exercise (Paperback)

    I came to Johnsgard’s book as a recreational runner with none of the psychological disorders he addresses in his book (none diagnosed, anyway). Actually, the title of this delightful book is something of a misnomer; only one of the four sections deals specifically with mental health. In the other three sections, Johnsgard-a psychology professor and a long-time distance runner-takes what I would call an anthropological view of the sport, addressing, as he does, the history of Homo Sapiens and our natural inclination to run. Johnsgard’s book is a training manual, a DSM4, and a natural history all in one.

    What I appreciated most about the book-and there’s plenty here for expert runners as well as beginners-was the author’s unique perspective. Using both clinical data and anthropological evidence, Johnsgard shows us how far we’ve come from Shangri-La, and how running can help us return. The author is a fellow homo-naturalis, so if you’re homo-progressus, you’re not going to find your techno-manna here. Johnsgard debunks the protein diet fads and gives evidence that elements of the hunter-gatherer existence are necessary for physical and mental well-being.

    Johnsgard is foremost a good storyteller, and beginning with book’s prologue, he incorporates elements of case study to illuminate his topics. The result is a thoroughly interesting read about the science and history of running. And while the author is always knowledgeable about his subjects-from existential drift to cardiorespiratory fitness-he’s humble too; one gets the sense that he’s learned all this news the hard way, and at some personal expense. Johnsgard comes across as the kind of runner you’d like to meet on the trail.

    Chances are you’ll see yourself often in these pages, and that you’ll come away with at least a few ideas for self-improvement through exercise.

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  2. Cate said,

    Wrote on June 23, 2012 @ 6:45 pm

    25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Very Helpful Book, June 26, 2005
    By 
    Cate (Portland, OR USA) –

    This review is from: Conquering Depression and Anxiety Through Exercise (Paperback)

    The reviewer below, C Fink, wrote a great review of this book, but I have one comment to add: although the author is a runner and some of the studies he cites are based on runners, the author states clearly that any aerobic exercise is fine. I’m not a runner and as I was reading, I didn’t think of it as a running book (I prefer bicycling and hiking/walking).

    I’ve read quite a few books on depression and anxiety. Although many of them helped me to learn and understand, this book was the most practical/pragmatic. Move your body, breathe hard, you’ll feel better. (As the author states, one may also need therapy and medication.)

    I feel like giving this book to people living with depression and/or anxiety. It could make a huge difference.

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  3. JJ McClay said,

    Wrote on June 23, 2012 @ 7:21 pm

    11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Very insightful, December 16, 2008
    By 
    JJ McClay (Australia) –

    This review is from: Conquering Depression and Anxiety Through Exercise (Paperback)

    This is one of the best books I have read on depression – and I’ve read a boatload. Keeping in mind that different people respond to information in different ways, choose this book if you like reading facts, statistics, scientific studies and their application to depression (don’t let that description lead you to believe the book is dry or dull, just that this is not a wishy-washy book filled with reader testimonies or inspiring images). I especially enjoyed his meta-analysis of multiple studies which he used to illustrate many different aspects of the relationship between depression and exercise, and also his discussion of diet and weightloss in a depression context. Whilst his tone is factual and serious (with everything referenced and clearly backed up), everything is still well explained for the layperson (such as myself). I highly reccommend this book.

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