Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy: The Neurobiology of Embodied Response (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy: The Neurobiology of Embodied Response (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy: The Neurobiology of Embodied Response (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

A systematic look at the role of “gut feelings” in psychotherapy.

What actually happens in psychotherapy, outside the confines of therapeutic models and techniques? How can clinicians learn to pick up on interpersonal nuance, using their intuition to bridge the gap between theory and practice? Drawing from 30 years of clinical experience, Marks-Tarlow explores the central— yet neglected—topic of intuition in psychotherapy, sharing clinical insights and intuitions that can help transform traumatized brains into healthy minds.

Bridging art and science, Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy is grounded in interpersonal neurobiology, and filled with rich case vignettes, personal stories, and original artwork. In the early chapters of the book, Marks-Tarlow defines clinical intuition as a right-brain, fully embodied mode of perceiving, relating, and responding to the ongoing flows and changing dynamics of psychotherapy. She examines how the body “has a mind of its own” in the form of implicit processes, uncovering the implicit roots of clinical intuition within human empathy and emphasizing the importance of play to clinical intuition.

Encouraging therapists to bring their own unique senses of humor to clinical practice, she explains how the creative neural powers of playfulness, embedded within sensitive clinical dialogs, can move clients’ lives toward lasting positive affective growth.

Later chapters explore the play of imagination within clinical intuition, where imagery and metaphor can lead to deeper insight about underlying emotions and relational truths than words alone; the developmental foundations for intuition; and clinical intuition as a vehicle for developing and expressing wisdom. At the close of each chapter, reflective exercises help the reader personally integrate the concepts.

Part of the Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology, this wonderful guidebook will help clinicians harness the power of spontaneous intuitive thinking to transform their therapeutic practices.

List Price: $ 35.00

Price: $ 28.00


3 Comments so far »

  1. Dr. Elisabeth Crim said,

    Wrote on February 13, 2013 @ 7:34 pm

    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    At LAST!!! Thank you, Dr. Terry Marks-Tarlow!, May 5, 2012
    By 
    Dr. Elisabeth Crim (Torrance, CA, USA) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy: The Neurobiology of Embodied Response (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology) (Hardcover)

    AT LAST! Reading Dr. Terry Marks-Tarlow’s new book, Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy, is like drinking delicious, cool, satisfying water after living the last few decades in a parched desert in which linear, “evidenced-based,” and cognitive-behavioral theories have been erroneously upheld as superior to right-brain, intersubjective and psychodynamic approaches to relational and mental health treatment. Dr. Marks-Tarlow does a masterful job of honoring both left-brain and right-brain neurobiology and experiential processes that are at play in every effective psychotherapy session regardless of theoretical orientation, while truly delineating in an engaging manner the significant role of intuition as the right-brain embodied experience that is required in true relational and psychological healing. Seasoned professionals who have witnessed the waves of thought and focus in the field of psychology and psychotherapy over the last few decades will delight in her thoughtful, creative (LOVE the art and images in this book!), and scientific integration of the linear and nonlinear, left and right neurobiology and therapist-patient experience of relationship and psychotherapy process. Dr. Marks-Tarlow achieves this with intelligence, humor and play. Through each chapter, she powerfully honors the role of intuition as the force of right brain, embodied executive functioning to which left brain executive functioning both submits and collaborates in true clinical healing of those we serve. A must read for seasoned professionals, students and those newly licensed in the field of mental health. BRAVO, Dr. Terry Marks-Tarlow! And THANK YOU!!!!!
    – Dr. Elisabeth Crim, Licensed Psychologist, Author/Presenter of Dancing the Transference Articles, Seminars, Consultation and Founder/Director of Moonstone Center

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  2. Victoria C. said,

    Wrote on February 13, 2013 @ 8:01 pm

    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Acclaim for Dr. Marks-Tarlow’s Clinical intuition in Psychotherapy, April 17, 2012
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy: The Neurobiology of Embodied Response (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology) (Hardcover)

    Rarely does one come across a book that combines the brilliant mind of a scientist with the creative genius of an artist. In Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy by Terry Marks-Tarlow, we now have that book. Clinical Intuition…is a valuable and accessible tool for the 21st century psychotherapist who is learning how to incorporate the new paradigm shift from behavior/cognition to embodied emotion into his/her practice.

    Via clinical vignettes, scientific explanation, and her own creative drawings, Dr. Marks-Tarlow offers both the clinician and the layman/consumer a window into what transpires during this cutting-edge form of therapy in which the actual structure of the brain can be changed.

    Not only will this book help me in my clinical practice, but it will motivate my addicted clients to trust their gut and tap into their own intuitive abilities.

    Thank you , thank you, thank you Dr. Marks-Tarlow!

    Victoria Cooper, M.A., MBSR

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  3. James F. Morris "Jim Morris" said,

    Wrote on February 13, 2013 @ 8:39 pm

    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Signal Contribution, May 28, 2012
    By 
    James F. Morris “Jim Morris” (CA USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Clinical Intuition in Psychotherapy: The Neurobiology of Embodied Response (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology) (Hardcover)

    This is a book written expressly for psychotherapists, and I am not one. So, what are my qualifications for reviewing this book, and what is my reason for doing so? My qualifications are that I took Psych 101 in college, have been a patient of three psychotherapists over a decade (I moved around a lot) and, for one edition was the editor of record for Carl Jung’s Man and His Symbols. It was something like the 27th edition, and all I had to do was approve the cover design and copy, which had been set in stone for years. I didn’t even have to read the book, though I had done so years previously. I also read and edited a fair number of pop psych books over the years, and while this is not one a comparison may be useful.
    As to why I read and am reviewing it, I am a friend and neighbor of the author. I should point out that as an editor and author most of my friends are writers, and they all want me to review their books on Amazon. This has resulted in some raves and quite a few “By George that IS a baby!” reviews. This is one of the raves. I do not pass those out like cocktail peanuts. To jump to the bottom line this book may well be a signal contribution to the literature of psychotherapy. There aren’t many books on intuition in this field, so another is needed, and this one is terrific.
    It frequently ventures into areas that are too technical for an amateur like me, such as designation of specific areas of brain anatomy for specific functions. Here I’m lost. But I understood most of it well enough, and the parts I did understand were worth at least six of those pop psych wonders which are little more than expanded Cosmo pieces.
    As to the importance of the subject my experiences as a patient have led me to believe that the effectiveness of an analyst’s treatment is directly proportional to his or her intuition. If all the patient receives is a burst of insert Tab A in slot B psychobabble, then he or she would have been better served to save the time and money.
    The level of writing in this book is light years better than most writing in the social sciences. It is written in clear understandable, and indeed enjoyable prose. It is illustrated by examples from the treatment of real patients, and an interesting lot they are too. A simple list of chapter titles will give a sense of its breadth and depth: Flashes, Hunches and Gut Feelings; Implicit Processes; Empathetic Roots; Play; Survival of the Wittiest; Lighting the Way; Navigating the Seas, and In Pursuit of Wisdom.
    I would not like to close without commenting on the author, as her personality plays a part in this book. Most social science writing, at least in my experience, is deadly dull (Jung excepted). But even though attention is paid to the lingo of psychotherapy, and all the scientific bases are touched, the warmth, care, compassion, and wit of the author comes through. This book is as marvelous as it is useful.

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